Chancellor of Soul's Chronicles-Journals Dedicated To The
Historical Preservation Of R&B, Pop and It's Artists and Music


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 The Dells Part I
The Dells Part II
Donnie Elbert
Disco Lady (The Making Of The First Platinum Single)
Don Cornelius (The Story Of Soul Train)
Choice of Colors
   (The Story of Curtis Mayfield's Masterpiece Composition)
Sunday Dec 10, 1967 3:28 PM / Otis Redding: 'A Tribute In Soul
Music History
Linda Jones 'The Queen Of New Jersey Soul'
The Esquires
The Twist  Part I
The Twist Part II
The Twist  Part III
The Twist  Part IV 
  Archie Bell & The Drells
Cliff Nobles
The Van Dykes
Betty Wright 
Bettye Swann
Billy Stewart
Bobby Taylor & the Vancouvers 
Jerry O
Wilson Pickett
Dyke & The Blazers
Dee Dee Warwick
Cold Sweat
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WCOS Internet Soul
I Never Loved A Man
Oh Happy Day
James Carr
Brenda & The Tabulations
Johnny "Guitar" Watson
Hope, Faith & Charity
Walter Jackson
Josie Jo Armstead
∙ The Spinners (Pt. I)
∙ The Spinners (Pt.II)
Shorty Long
Deon Jackson        
Al Green     
Oh Happy Day
 Freddie Scott

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Dells Part I


Over the years, many R&B vocal groups have come and gone. Sometimes,  many separate even after their first string of hits. Or, could be personality differences, among themselves, or for just, silly egotistical reasons. There's is one group that stood the test of time, even though many hardships.


The Dells Part II


 Sylvia & Joe Robinson of All Platinum Records in Englewood, New Jersey, would purchase all of the Chess masters, for nearly a million dollars and 3 years later, release a 3 record set compilation LP entitled, "Memories Of Pillow Talk", in 1978.  It was advertised on television, and sold nearly a half million copies! 

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Donnie Elbert

 

Donnie Elbert would sadly enter the kingdom of soul heaven on January 31, 1989, after massive stroke. He will always remain a true rarity in R&B music history but shouldn't be forgotten, of the multi-talents of his great music that he left for us to appreciate and enjoy.

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Disco Lady (The Making Of The First Platinum Single)

While writing the lyrics, another inspiration came to mind of an classic Curtis Mayfield 1961 composition hit, "Gypsy Woman". In the song, a dancer would hypnotized everyone with her gyrations around the campfire, including Curtis.  Don would later add horns arranged by legendary Motown producer, David Van DePitte, who in 1971, produced Marvin Gaye's landmark  LP,  "What's Going On".

 

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Don Cornelius (The Story Of Soul Train)

If you ever wanted purchase a ticket on a funky train ride and travel to the hippest place in America, get on board !  You're about to experience a world where there's plenty of great music and dancing. Brothers and Sisters, let's climb aboard the Sooooooul Train!

 

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Choice of Colors (The Story of Curtis Mayfield's Masterpiece Composition)

 

Curtis questions our weakness of lust and lack of respect for another man's woman. It's a tool he uses again in the subconscious in all us as humans with the thought of temptation running though our minds the minute we think a good thing comes along. 

 

 

 

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Otis Redding

 

Otis Redding was one of the most dominant entertainers in the history ofOtis Redding music. His legacy still continues to shine brightly in hearts of many R&B fans, worldwide. 1967 was Otis' last triumph to fame and fortune until his untimely death on Dec 10.

 

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Linda Jones


Linda Jones was born on January 14, 1944. Her upbringing comes from familyLinda Jones gospel singers named, the Jones Singers. From a toddler to her early teens, Linda had a very unique powerful vocal range. Battling diabetes as a child, nothing would stop her from obtaining her lifetime dreams of becoming a famous singer. At the age of 19, Linda signed with Cub Records (a subsidiary of MGM) and record Jackie Wilson's 1959 hit 'Lonely Teardrops' backed with 'Cancel the Celebration' in 1963 under the name, Linda Lane. The song would sink without a trace.

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The Esquires

The EsquiresIn 1965, 8 years later, The Esquires now consisted of Gilbert and Alvis Moorer, Sam Pace, and Shawn Taylor. Betty Moorer had dropped out. In 1966, the group saw that Milwaukee had little recording opportunities to get their feet wet, so they decided to try their luck in Chicago.

 

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The Twist Part I

 

Chubby's version of the Twist was so close to Hank Ballard's version, it even fooled Hank! One day, while swimming in a pool in Miami, Hank heard the song on the radio and was very overjoyed that he was receiving airplay on white stations.

 

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The Twist Part II

Hank Ballard and The Midnighters


After the success of Chubby Checker's recording of the Twist, it became the most successful dance in the country. Everybody was twisting and it introduced a new concept in the way we danced called, 'apart dancing', where both parties can  enjoy dancing apart instead of touching each other.
other short dance craze in the
 

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The Twist Part III

The Peppermint Lounge

 

The Peppermint Lounge became the spot in New York for fun and recreation. Sam Cooke was inspired to write a song about the famous club entitled, 'Twistin' The Night Away'. He was at home one morning watching the 'Today' show on television. The show featured a segment on the Peppermint Lounge, showing the socialites doing the Twist and having a good time.

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The Twist Part IV

Chubby Checker's forth LP, 'Your Twist Party', released in 1962
hit top ten on both the R&B and Pop Album charts. Variety trade  paper reporter, Joe Cohen, wrote liner notes for the LP, front and back cover. The dance craze became so popular with the older crowds, jazz great Count Basie got into the act with his version of the 'Basie Twist' on Roulette records. Frank Sinatra, who never really cared for rock and roll, couldn't ignore the hype by recording a version of, 'Everybody's Twistin'.

 

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Archie Bell & The Drells

 

In early 1960, the Drells became a quartet with the line up of Billy
Butler (no relation to the singer Jerry Butler), James Wise, and Joe Cross. Six years later in 1966, they met DeeJay / Record entrepreneur and mailman, Skipper Lee Frazier at a talent show at a club in Le Porte, Texas called Seven Beach.

 

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Cliff Nobles

 

Born in 1944, Cliff became interested in music during his years in high school. He joined a local singing group called the Delrays and shortly afterwards, moved to Philadelphia and lived in a section called, Norristown. He stayed with some friends and formed a group called Cliff Nobles & Co. The group signed with J-V Records  and recorded,  'Too Fond of You' b/w  'My Love Is Getting Stronger'. The song flop, so they signed with Atlantic records and recorded a newer version of 'Too Fond of You'  b/w  'My Love Is Getting Stronger'.  

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The Van Dykes

 

Out of the Windy City of Chicago, The Impressions would change the course of vocal history by combining sweet tantalizing harmony with a call and response seed planted from the roots of gospel music. A combination that
would inject into the world of R&B listeners. This transplant would seep into one listener, Rondalis Tandy from Forth Worth, Texas.

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Betty Wright

 

From 1973 thru 1976 Betty racked up a total of 10 hits with 'It's Hard To Stop (Doing Something When It's Good To You) (No 11 R&B)… 'Let Me Be Your Lovemaker' (my personal favorite) (No 10 R&B)....
'It's Bad For Me To See You' (No 66 R&B)...'Secretary' (No 12 R&B)… 'Shoorah! Shoorah' written by legendary singer/ songwriter /producer Allen Toussaint with a classic B-side 'Tonight Is The Night' (No28 R&B)...the dance classic 'Where Is The Love' (No 15 R&B)...'Ooola La' (No 28 R&B)... 'Slip And Do It' (No 21 R&B) and 'If I Ever Do It' (No 21 R&B).

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Bettye Swann

 

Bettye would propel to stardom with her masterpiece composition  'Make Me Yours'  b/w  'I Will Not Cry'. The session took place on Friday, February 3, 1967 at Audio Arts Studios. The musicians were James Carmichael (future producer for the Commodores) on piano,  Abraham Mills on drums, Bob West (writer for the Jackson 5 million seller 1970 hit  'I'll Be There') on bass, legendary artist Roy Ayers on vibes along with Alton Hammond and Gary Coleman,  Charles Wright (of the Soul Runners and leader of the Watts 103rd St Rhythm Band) and Les Buie on guitar.

 

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Billy Stewart

While appearing at a concert in D.C. Billy was discovered by Bo Diddley and invited him to join his band. He spent a few years on the road with Bo developing his talents on the organ, bass and drums. He got an opportunity to record for Chess Records because of his association with Diddley and cut his first single for the label entitled 'Billy's Blues' (Pt's 1 & 2)' in 1956, featuring Bo on guitar.

 

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Bobby Taylor & the Vancouvers

Bobby served as the lead vocalist and producer, Tommy Chong and Wes Henderson as lead guitarists, Eddie Henderson on bass, Robbie King on keyboards, and Ted Lewis on drums. The group traveled parts of the West Coast until their return back to British Columbia. Tommy Chong's family leased a parlor in Vancouver named the Elegant Parlor and they settled as the club's house band.

 

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Jerry-O

After witnessing kids demonstrating the boogaloo dance at Herb 'The Kool Gent' Kent (WVON-AM) record hop, the duo recorded a single entitled, 'Boogaloo' b/w ‘Boomerang' on the ABC-Paramount label. In the spring of 1965, the song charted No. 11 on Billboard's R&B singles, the week ending June 5, 1965.

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Wilson Pickett

 

 

On Wednesday, May 12, 1965 'In The Midnight Hour' was cut at the Stax studios in Memphis, featuring 3 members of Booker T. & the MG's (the late Al Jackson Jr. on drums, Donald ‘Duck’ Dunn on bass and Steve Cropper on guitar). Other personnel include, The Memphis Horns (Wayne Jackson on trumpet, the late Charles 'Packy' Axton and Andrew Love on tenor sax, Floyd Newman on baritone sax and piano player Joe Hall.

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Dyke and The Blazers


In 1965, Dyke sang and played bass with the O'Jays road band, the Blazers. The group was left stranded in Phoenix, Arizona as the O'Jays couldn't afford to bring them back to Buffalo. In order to get home, the Blazers decided to raise money by working in various clubs in the city. Dyke became lead singer therefore changing the roster to Dyke & The Blazers.

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Dee Dee Warwick 

 

Dee Dee Warwick learned the song from a demo though it’s originals composers, Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Dionne recorded the song and sold a million (No. 5 R&B. No. 15 Pop) in the spring of 1967 while Dee Dee’s version remained in the can for a few years. Dee Dee said that Dionne didn't even considered doing the song before her and forgets to mention her version provided her with a great demo. Dionne's was the 42nd version recorded.

 

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COLD SWEAT

‘'Cold Sweat' was a reworked version of a slow blues tune called  'Don't Care' from a 1962 LP entitled, 'James Brown and the Famous Flames Tour The  U.S.A.' The horn lines were dubbed from Miles Davis' classic recording of  'So What' from his masterpiece LP 'Kind Of Blue'. The album featured such jazz greats as John Coltrane, Bill Evans and Julian 'Cannonball' Adderley.

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I Never Loved a Man

 

Released Friday March 10, 'I Never Loved A Man The Way I Loved You' LP (charted No. 1 R&B LP No. 2 Pop April 29). It remained on the album charts for an astonishing 49 weeks! The self-titled single 'I Never Loved A Man' debuted at the (No 1 position on the R&B singles chart March 25 1967). The flipside 'Do Right Woman-Do Right Man' hit (No. 37 R&B April 17).

 

 

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Oh Happy Day

In May 1967, Edwin Hawkins, born 1943 in Oakland, California and his associate Betty Watson, organized a 46 piece gospel choir to represent their church in Oakland,  'The Ephesian Church of God in Christ'. Edwin needed to raise funds for a trip to sing at a convention given at the National Youth Congress,  in Cleveland. The choir recorded an LP of 8 songs including the 18th century fiery gospel composition, 'Oh Happy Day' in the basement of the Berkeley Church of Christ in San Francisco. Recorded on a old two-track ampex tape machine, the album entitled 'Let Us Go  Into The House Of The Lord' went on to sell 600 copies.

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James Carr

Born on June 13, 1942 in Coahoma County, Mississippi near Clarksdale.James Carr During his infancy years, James' parents brought the family to Memphis, Tenn. where his musical background began in church. His family formed a gospel group called the Southern Wonders Juniors when James was 9 years of age. As an adult, he gained most of his experience on the road, as a member of the Sunset Travelers and the Harmony Echoes, while working as a laborer and supporting a family. Through his travels, James met singer/songwriter, Roosevelt Jamison in 1962. Jamison, a member of the Redemption Harmonizers, developed a friendship with James through encounters at various gospel revivals.

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Brenda & The Tabulations
The soulful sounds of Brenda & the Tabulations evolved around the summer of 1966 when Maurice Coates and Brenda Payton worked at a children's playground in downtown Philadelphia. Maurice and Brenda sang together for a show they put together for the children.

With Brenda as lead singer, Maurice along with guitarist Eddie Jackson and James Rucker (who also worked at The 2nd and Lehigh playground), together they formed   Brenda & the Tabulations.

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Johnny "Guitar" Watson

Watson recut the influential Bo Diddley uncharted classic 'Gangster Of Love' on Tuesday, May 14, 1963.   Singer/ songwriter Steve Miller would record the tune in 1968 and Watson would reprise it during his hot streak in the mid 70’s.  He cut single in 1964 on the Highland label entitled, 'Oh So Fine' b/w 'Wait A Minute Baby'.
 

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Hope, Faith & Charity

In a land called 'soulsville' there have beenHope, Faith & Charity
thousands of songs composed and sung by singers, songwriters and producers where they receive many accolades and praises through liner notes written on the back of album covers or CD's, by music critics or famous entertainers.

 

 

 

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Walter Jackson

With a stroke of pen, Curtis composed a great double sided single 'That’s What Mama Say' (answer song to Jan Bradley's 62' smash 'Mama Didn't Lie') and a lovely ballad entitled, 'What Would You Do'. While the song received airplay in the east coast region, Walter's next single 'It's All Over' (penned by Mayfield) b/w 'Lee Cross' (originally recorded by Aretha Franklin on Columbia and written by Ted White, Aretha's ex-husband), placed him at the No.10 position on Cashbox's R&B Top 50 chart, the week ending, Sat Nov 21, 1964. Billboard deleted the R&B charts from the magazine, from Nov 21, 1963 til Jan 30, 1965.  A self-titled LP 'It's All Over was released in 1965.


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Josie Jo Armstead

 

Around this time she met two New York songwriters, Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson. The two were known in the music industry as Nick & Val and recorded their first release on Glover entitled, ‘I'll Find You’ and worked as staff writers on Florence Greenberg’s Scepter/ Wand label located on 254 W 54th St. The pair invited Joshie to join as a writer. Together the dynamic trio penned such great classics as ‘The Real Thing’ by Tina Britt (No.20 R&B June 19, 1965) on Eastern. ‘The Shoe Won't Fit’ and ‘Too Hot Too Hold for Betty Everett on Vee Jay. They also wrote material for Chuck Jackson, Maxine Brown, the Shirelles, Doris Troy, Mitty Collier etc;
 

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The Spinners

Atlantic Records teamed the Spinners with Jimmy Roach who was a former songwriter/ producer atMotown.  Jimmy cut 4 sides with the quintet  including   ‘(Oh Lord)  I Wish I Could Sleep’ in January 72’.  The session didn't fair to well with the promotion department and was terminated. Vice-president Henry Allen called songwriter /producer Thom Bell and offered him a choice of any artist on Atlantic’s roster sheet to work with.  Bell saw on the bottom of the list the word  ‘spinn’ and asked Allen if it  was the Spinners  (Thom’s favorite group).  Henry confirmed it was them  and Bell agreed to produce them.

 

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Shorty Long

Shorty inaugurated Berry Gordy’s subsidiary Soul label (intended for blues artists) with  ‘Devil With The Blue Dress On’  in March 1964.  Although it never charted for Long,  it became a huge hit for Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels in October 1966. ‘Out To Get You’  b/w  ‘ It’s Crying Shame’  was Shorty’s second uncharted single in August 1964. Shorty is featured on harmonica on this early dance classic.

 

 

 

 


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Deon Jackson

 

Carla issued 3 singles on Deon Jackson in 1966, ‘Love Takes A Long Time Growing’ b/w ‘ Hush Little Baby’, ‘ I Can't Do Without You’ b/w ‘ That’s What You Do To Me’, and  ‘When Your Love Has Gone’ b/w ‘ Hard To Get A Thing Called Love’. The classic ‘Ooo Baby’ b/w ‘All On A Sunny Day’ hit
(No. 28 R&B Dec 30, 1967) while ‘You Gotta Love’ b/w  'You'll Wake Up Wiser Baby’ his last Carla release, failed to chart. The late Bert Berns signed Deon to his Shout label in 1969 and produced Jackson’s final single, ‘I'll Always Love You’ b/w ‘Life Can Be That Way’.

 

 

 


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Al Green

While Al Green was on tour in England, Willie Mitchell and Al Jackson Jr, recorded a demo featuring only piano and drums. Mitchell envisioned Al Green's vocals and music in a lower register, for a crossover appeal. When Green returned from the tour, Willie gave him the demo and asked him ‘do you hear anything?' Al said 'give me 15 minutes’, composing the lyrics and christening the title 'Let's Stay Together', a two folded story based on a broken love affair whether good or bad desperately working its way into a forever lasting relationship, guessing his on and off relationship with Laura Lee.
 


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Oh Happy Day

In May 1967, Edwin Hawkins, born 1943 in Oakland, California and his associate Betty
Watson, organized a 46 piece gospel choir to represent their church in Oakland,  ‘The Ephesian Church of God in Christ’. Edwin needed to raise funds for a trip to sing at a
convention given at the National Youth Congress,  in Cleveland. The choir recorded an LP of 8 songs including the 18th century fiery gospel composition, ‘Oh Happy Day’ in the basement of the Berkeley Church of Christ in San Francisco. Recorded on a old two-track ampex tape machine, the album entitled ‘Let Us Go  Into The House Of The Lord’ went on to sell 600 copies.

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Freddie Scott

Born on April 24, 1933 in Providence, Rhode Island, Freddie began singing at the age of 12, in his grandmother's gospel group, 'Sally Jones & The Gospel Keyes' while they toured England. At 15, Scott attended Cooper High School in New York City, then pursued a career in medicine in Augusta, Ga. as a premed. With a change of heart, Freddie decided to give up medicine and resume his singing career with the Swanee Quintet Juniors. He was also a member of The Bill Johnson Band and The Shytone 5 Orchestra.

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